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After baseline data were collected, the NIZ (phase 2) was created by placing red duct tape around each of the 5 decentralized medication carts and the central medication preparation area (Figure 1 ). In the morning, before the red duct tape was placed, the ICU clinical nurse specialist trained the nursing staff about the NIZ. To allow the staff to become accustomed to the NIZ, a 3-week run-in period was used to minimize the newness of the NIZ and staff members’ response to the newly created NIZ.

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Figure 1

No Interruption Zone created by placing red duct tape around all areas where medications are prepared.

During the fourth week after the NIZ was created (phase 3), following the same protocol as used in phase 1, we collected observational data on medication administration occurrences and interruptions, critical events, and ICU activity. At the end of data collection, the nursing staff was debriefed on the actual purpose, scope, and intent of the study, and they were told the results at the end of the study.

ICU Sample

During all 3 phases of the study period, the ICU activity was similar. The mean ICU census was 17.3 before implementation of the NIZ (SD, 2.32) and 16.0 (SD, 2.07) after implementation of the NIZ. Similarly, during the observation periods before the NIZ was implemented, there were 4 admissions of patients, 5 discharges, and 1 critical event. After the NIZ was implemented, there were 3 admissions of patients, 3 discharges, and 0 critical events.

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Before implementation of the NIZ, we counted a total of 218 occurrences (mean, 27.25; SD, 6.23; range, 9–49) and 76 interruptions (mean, 9.50; SD, 6.23; range, 1–19; Figure 2 ), with 73.6% categorized as interruptions initiated by others (n =56) and 26.4% (n=20) categorized as self-interruptions. After implementation of the NIZ, we counted a total of 179 occurrences (mean, 22.38; SD, 12.09; range, 14–50) and 37 interruptions (mean, 4.63; SD, 3.70; range, 0–11), with 100% of interruptions categorized as interruptions initiated by others (Figure 3 Zadig amp; Voltaire Wool Knit Sweater w/ Tags Cheap Sale Brand New Unisex Cool Shopping Discount Low Cost SkpKCGMDy
). During data collection both before and after implementation of the NIZ, non-nurse interruptions were noted to originate from clinical partners, radiology and pharmacy technicians, respiratory therapists, secretaries, family, and physicians.

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Figure 2

Total numbers of interruptions and occurrences before and after implementation of No Interruption Zone.

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Figure 3

Interruptions per occurrence initiated by self or others before and after implementation of No Interruption Zone.

To standardize the metric to compare interruptions to occurrences before and after implementation of the NIZ, a percentage was calculated by dividing the number of interruptions by the total number of occurrences (Figure 3 Cheap Outlet Miu Miu Woven KneeLength Skirt Explore Cheap Latest Collections Sale Get Authentic Cheap Pay With Paypal ao4C9qLOL
). Before the NIZ was implemented, the percentage of interruptions was 31.8% (SD, 11%) and after the NIZ was implemented, the percentage was 18.8% (SD, 10%), a 40.9% decrease. A 2-tailed independent t test showed a statistically significant difference between interruptions before and after implementation of the NIZ ( t =2.40, df =14, P =.03). To assess the clinical importance of this change, an effect size was calculated to be 1.3. (Effect size refers to the size of the difference between scores. It is one way to assess whether statistical significance is useful or clinically important. An effect size of 1.3 is considered to be a large difference.)

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NEW YORK--( BUSINESS WIRE )-- from Argentina is one of the ten global grassroots organizations receiving the 2017 Intercultural Innovation Award bestowed by the United Nations Alliance of Civilizations (UNAOC) and the BMW Group.

The IIA Ceremony, held this year for the first time at UN headquarters in New York, was chaired by Mr. Nassir Abdulaziz Al-Nasser, High Representative for the United Nations Alliance of Civilizations, and Mr. Bill McAndrews, Vice President BMW Group Communications Strategy, Corporate and Market Communications. Burning Torch CrochetAccented Maxi Dress Cheap 2018 New Cut-Price The Cheapest Sale Online Clearance Fashionable New Styles d3DOu

“Being able to share our project at the Intercultural Innovation Award Ceremony meant that more people around the world now know about our work,” said Florencia Fisch, Manager for Educational Content and Projects. “Our main event is the largest event on human rights for young people in our country. Every time we guarantee someone’s rights, we are closer to that better society we are all here building.”

Encontrarse en la Diversidad was established in response to the lack of awareness about discrimination in Argentina. The organization works with youth, making visible day-to-day practices that reinforce discrimination and providing tools to recognize and dismantle such practices. By offering dynamic workshops in educational institutions, the project not only promotes, but takes action on diversity and inclusion.

The IIA initiative supports grassroots initiatives that promote intercultural dialogue and understanding, thereby contributing to peace, cultural diversity and more inclusive societies.

In addition to a financial grant, Encontrarse en la Diversidad will receive support from UNAOC and the BMW Group to help their project expand and replicate in other contexts. This model of collaboration between the UN and the private sector creates deeper impact, as both partners provide their respective expertise to ensure the sustainable growth of each project. Assistance is customized based on the specific needs of award recipients.

ARGENTINA’S “ENCONTRARSE EN LA DIVERSIDAD” RECEIVES THE INTERCULTURAL INNOVATION AWARD

Contacts

BMW GroupMilena Pighi, +49-89-382-66563Head of Corporate Social Responsibility [email protected] orUNAOCAlessandro Girola, +1- 929-274-6217Programming Coordinator [email protected]

United Nations Alliance of Civilizations

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When you’re working with the framework classes, you’ll notice that Objective-C code is very easy to read. Class and method names are much more descriptive than you might find with general C code functions or the C Standard Library, and camel case is used for names with multiple words. You should follow the same conventions used by Cocoa and Cocoa Touch when you’re writing your own classes to make your code more readable, both for you and for other Objective-C developers that may need to work with your projects, and to keep your codebase consistent.

In addition, many Objective-C and framework features require you to follow strict naming conventions in order for various mechanisms to work correctly. Accessor method names, for example, must follow the conventions in order to work with techniques such as Key-Value Coding (KVC) or Key-Value Observing (KVO).

This chapter covers some of the most common conventions used in Cocoa and Cocoa Touch code, and explains the situations when it’s necessary for names to be unique across an entire app project, including its linked frameworks.

Some Names Must Be Unique Across Your App

Each time you create a new type, symbol, or identifier, you should first consider the scope in which the name must be unique. Sometimes this scope might be the entire application, including its linked frameworks; sometimes the scope is limited just to an enclosing class or even just a block of code.

Objective-C classes must be named uniquely not only within the code that you’re writing in a project, but also across any frameworks or bundles you might be including. As an example, you should avoid using generic class names like ViewController or TextParser because it’s possible a framework you include in your app may fail to follow conventions and create classes with the same names.

In order to keep class names unique, the convention is to use prefixes on all classes. You’ll have noticed that Cocoa and Cocoa Touch class names typically start either with NS or UI . Two-letter prefixes like these are reserved by Apple for use in framework classes. As you learn more about Cocoa and Cocoa Touch, you’ll encounter a variety of other prefixes that relate to specific frameworks:

Your own classes should use three letter prefixes. These might relate to a combination of your company name and your app name, or even a specific component within your app. As an example, if your company were called Whispering Oak, and you were developing a game called Zebra Surprise, you might choose WZS or WOZ as your class prefix.

You should also name your classes using a noun that makes it clear what the class represents, like these examples from Cocoa and Cocoa Touch:

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